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200 North Main St | Bloomington, Illinois | 309-827-0428

Saturday, October 2

2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk Cemetery Walk

Starts at 11:00 AM
305 E. Miller Street, Bloomington, IL 61701

After 27 years, the Evergreen Cemetery Walk continues going strong, while evolving to meet the changing needs of the people whom we serve. This year’s roster will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. The stories of these individuals offer glimpses into every-day life on the Illinois prairie, shares how individuals in our community bore witness to one of the greatest tragedies in U.S. history, and also about the power of how an individual can start a movement to combat stereotypes and misinformation about an entire group of people. The impact individuals like these had on our history can be felt near and far.

Additionally, taking those lessons we learned last year into consideration, this year’s Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be BOTH an in-person Walk and a Virtual Walk. This will allow us to continue to offer the Walk to all the audiences that we serve no matter where you live or what your physical abilities may be.

The 2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be held on Saturdays and Sundays, September 25-26 and October 2-3 with performances at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day. The Museum continues to monitor the conditions that surround the COVID-19 pandemic and our ability to hold in-person programs. As long as current health and safety guidelines from the CDC and State of Illinois allow for in-person programming, we plan to host small group tours on the beautiful grounds of Evergreen Memorial Cemetery once again. No matter what, the show will go on!

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Museum’s website mchistory.org, or at the Museum or Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. Tickets to participate in the in-person event are $20 for the General Public, $18 for Museum members, and $5 for children or students w/ID. Tickets to view the Virtual Walk online are $25 for the general public and $20 for Museum members household tickets (a household ticket means that anyone in your immediate household can view this event at any time—and as many times—between November 1 through December 31). Additionally, those who wish to attend the in-person Walk AND view the Virtual Walk can purchase a ticket for both for just $30.

This year’s Walk will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. This year’s feature characters are: Dr. William Hill (1829-1906), a surgeon in the Union Army who overcame accusations of being a “bodysnatcher” to become a well-liked and respected doctor in McLean County; William Rodenhauser (1842-1919), a German immigrant who worked as a carpenter for the C&A Railroad Shops for over 20 years; Julia Duff (1895-1984) and her sister Alverta Duff (1885-1968), who belonged to one of the earliest Black families to establish themselves in Normal and bore witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921; Mary Ann Marmon (1837-1908), who wrote about life growing up on the prairie, as her family was among the earliest settlers in McLean County; Sigmund Livingston (1872-1946) and Hilda Livingston (1892-1962), members of the Jewish Community and guest voices on this year’s Walk. Sigmund founded the Anti-Defamation League, which still exists today. And finally, George Carman (1838-1868), a printer, writer, actor, and public speaker who served as a soldier in the Union Army during the U.S. Civil War.

If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact the Education Department at 309-827-0428, via email at education@mchistory.org, or visit the Evergreen Cemetery Walk page on the Museum’s website at mchistory.org/learn/evergreen-cemetery-walk.

Saturday, October 2

2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk Cemetery Walk

Starts at 2:00 PM
305 E. Miller Street, Bloomington, IL 61701

After 27 years, the Evergreen Cemetery Walk continues going strong, while evolving to meet the changing needs of the people whom we serve. This year’s roster will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. The stories of these individuals offer glimpses into every-day life on the Illinois prairie, shares how individuals in our community bore witness to one of the greatest tragedies in U.S. history, and also about the power of how an individual can start a movement to combat stereotypes and misinformation about an entire group of people. The impact individuals like these had on our history can be felt near and far.

Additionally, taking those lessons we learned last year into consideration, this year’s Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be BOTH an in-person Walk and a Virtual Walk. This will allow us to continue to offer the Walk to all the audiences that we serve no matter where you live or what your physical abilities may be.

The 2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be held on Saturdays and Sundays, September 25-26 and October 2-3 with performances at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day. The Museum continues to monitor the conditions that surround the COVID-19 pandemic and our ability to hold in-person programs. As long as current health and safety guidelines from the CDC and State of Illinois allow for in-person programming, we plan to host small group tours on the beautiful grounds of Evergreen Memorial Cemetery once again. No matter what, the show will go on!

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Museum’s website mchistory.org, or at the Museum or Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. Tickets to participate in the in-person event are $20 for the General Public, $18 for Museum members, and $5 for children or students w/ID. Tickets to view the Virtual Walk online are $25 for the general public and $20 for Museum members household tickets (a household ticket means that anyone in your immediate household can view this event at any time—and as many times—between November 1 through December 31). Additionally, those who wish to attend the in-person Walk AND view the Virtual Walk can purchase a ticket for both for just $30.

This year’s Walk will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. This year’s feature characters are: Dr. William Hill (1829-1906), a surgeon in the Union Army who overcame accusations of being a “bodysnatcher” to become a well-liked and respected doctor in McLean County; William Rodenhauser (1842-1919), a German immigrant who worked as a carpenter for the C&A Railroad Shops for over 20 years; Julia Duff (1895-1984) and her sister Alverta Duff (1885-1968), who belonged to one of the earliest Black families to establish themselves in Normal and bore witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921; Mary Ann Marmon (1837-1908), who wrote about life growing up on the prairie, as her family was among the earliest settlers in McLean County; Sigmund Livingston (1872-1946) and Hilda Livingston (1892-1962), members of the Jewish Community and guest voices on this year’s Walk. Sigmund founded the Anti-Defamation League, which still exists today. And finally, George Carman (1838-1868), a printer, writer, actor, and public speaker who served as a soldier in the Union Army during the U.S. Civil War.

If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact the Education Department at 309-827-0428, via email at education@mchistory.org, or visit the Evergreen Cemetery Walk page on the Museum’s website at mchistory.org/learn/evergreen-cemetery-walk.

Sunday, October 3

2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk Cemetery Walk

Starts at 11:00 AM
305 E. Miller Street, Bloomington, IL 61701

After 27 years, the Evergreen Cemetery Walk continues going strong, while evolving to meet the changing needs of the people whom we serve. This year’s roster will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. The stories of these individuals offer glimpses into every-day life on the Illinois prairie, shares how individuals in our community bore witness to one of the greatest tragedies in U.S. history, and also about the power of how an individual can start a movement to combat stereotypes and misinformation about an entire group of people. The impact individuals like these had on our history can be felt near and far.

Additionally, taking those lessons we learned last year into consideration, this year’s Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be BOTH an in-person Walk and a Virtual Walk. This will allow us to continue to offer the Walk to all the audiences that we serve no matter where you live or what your physical abilities may be.

The 2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be held on Saturdays and Sundays, September 25-26 and October 2-3 with performances at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day. The Museum continues to monitor the conditions that surround the COVID-19 pandemic and our ability to hold in-person programs. As long as current health and safety guidelines from the CDC and State of Illinois allow for in-person programming, we plan to host small group tours on the beautiful grounds of Evergreen Memorial Cemetery once again. No matter what, the show will go on!

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Museum’s website mchistory.org, or at the Museum or Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. Tickets to participate in the in-person event are $20 for the General Public, $18 for Museum members, and $5 for children or students w/ID. Tickets to view the Virtual Walk online are $25 for the general public and $20 for Museum members household tickets (a household ticket means that anyone in your immediate household can view this event at any time—and as many times—between November 1 through December 31). Additionally, those who wish to attend the in-person Walk AND view the Virtual Walk can purchase a ticket for both for just $30.

This year’s Walk will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. This year’s feature characters are: Dr. William Hill (1829-1906), a surgeon in the Union Army who overcame accusations of being a “bodysnatcher” to become a well-liked and respected doctor in McLean County; William Rodenhauser (1842-1919), a German immigrant who worked as a carpenter for the C&A Railroad Shops for over 20 years; Julia Duff (1895-1984) and her sister Alverta Duff (1885-1968), who belonged to one of the earliest Black families to establish themselves in Normal and bore witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921; Mary Ann Marmon (1837-1908), who wrote about life growing up on the prairie, as her family was among the earliest settlers in McLean County; Sigmund Livingston (1872-1946) and Hilda Livingston (1892-1962), members of the Jewish Community and guest voices on this year’s Walk. Sigmund founded the Anti-Defamation League, which still exists today. And finally, George Carman (1838-1868), a printer, writer, actor, and public speaker who served as a soldier in the Union Army during the U.S. Civil War.

If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact the Education Department at 309-827-0428, via email at education@mchistory.org, or visit the Evergreen Cemetery Walk page on the Museum’s website at mchistory.org/learn/evergreen-cemetery-walk.

Sunday, October 3

2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk Cemetery Walk

Starts at 2:00 PM
305 E. Miller Street, Bloomington, IL 61701

After 27 years, the Evergreen Cemetery Walk continues going strong, while evolving to meet the changing needs of the people whom we serve. This year’s roster will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. The stories of these individuals offer glimpses into every-day life on the Illinois prairie, shares how individuals in our community bore witness to one of the greatest tragedies in U.S. history, and also about the power of how an individual can start a movement to combat stereotypes and misinformation about an entire group of people. The impact individuals like these had on our history can be felt near and far.

Additionally, taking those lessons we learned last year into consideration, this year’s Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be BOTH an in-person Walk and a Virtual Walk. This will allow us to continue to offer the Walk to all the audiences that we serve no matter where you live or what your physical abilities may be.

The 2021 Evergreen Cemetery Walk will be held on Saturdays and Sundays, September 25-26 and October 2-3 with performances at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day. The Museum continues to monitor the conditions that surround the COVID-19 pandemic and our ability to hold in-person programs. As long as current health and safety guidelines from the CDC and State of Illinois allow for in-person programming, we plan to host small group tours on the beautiful grounds of Evergreen Memorial Cemetery once again. No matter what, the show will go on!

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Museum’s website mchistory.org, or at the Museum or Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. Tickets to participate in the in-person event are $20 for the General Public, $18 for Museum members, and $5 for children or students w/ID. Tickets to view the Virtual Walk online are $25 for the general public and $20 for Museum members household tickets (a household ticket means that anyone in your immediate household can view this event at any time—and as many times—between November 1 through December 31). Additionally, those who wish to attend the in-person Walk AND view the Virtual Walk can purchase a ticket for both for just $30.

This year’s Walk will feature six new voices and bring back two voices to share a new story. This year’s feature characters are: Dr. William Hill (1829-1906), a surgeon in the Union Army who overcame accusations of being a “bodysnatcher” to become a well-liked and respected doctor in McLean County; William Rodenhauser (1842-1919), a German immigrant who worked as a carpenter for the C&A Railroad Shops for over 20 years; Julia Duff (1895-1984) and her sister Alverta Duff (1885-1968), who belonged to one of the earliest Black families to establish themselves in Normal and bore witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921; Mary Ann Marmon (1837-1908), who wrote about life growing up on the prairie, as her family was among the earliest settlers in McLean County; Sigmund Livingston (1872-1946) and Hilda Livingston (1892-1962), members of the Jewish Community and guest voices on this year’s Walk. Sigmund founded the Anti-Defamation League, which still exists today. And finally, George Carman (1838-1868), a printer, writer, actor, and public speaker who served as a soldier in the Union Army during the U.S. Civil War.

If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact the Education Department at 309-827-0428, via email at education@mchistory.org, or visit the Evergreen Cemetery Walk page on the Museum’s website at mchistory.org/learn/evergreen-cemetery-walk.

Tuesday, October 12

Zoom Breaking Bread in McLean County - America Meets East Asia: Mayonnaise in the Sushi

Starts at 6:00 PM

America Meets East Asia: Mayonnaise in the Sushi

The Museum, in partnership with BN Welcoming (a coalition of the Immigration Project, Not In Our Town/Not In Our Schools, West Bloomington Revitalization Project, Mennonite Church of Normal, and First United Methodist Church together creating a supportive environment for immigrants to McLean County), Design Streak at Illinois State University, and Heartland Community College will present a 10-part program series exploring stories of migration, immigration, adaptation, assimilation, appropriation, preservation, contribution, and sustentation in McLean County. Breaking Bread in McLean County will highlight the shared and disparate experiences of local migrant communities from the Kickapoo to the Congolese, emphasizing shared elements including food, family, tradition, trauma, and exchange; seeking to disrupt the historical chronology in order to promote a deeper understanding of the ways McLean County has traditionally treated its migrant communities. Programs will last approximately 1 hr with time reserved for Q&A.

Join Nobuko Adachi and James Stanlaw, professors of Sociology and Anthropology at Illinois State University, as they explore the intersection of East Asian and American cuisines and cultures.To register for this Zoom webinar, go to bit.ly/breakbread9

Thursday, October 14

Zoom Lunch & Learn: Math is your Friend! Lunch & Learn

Starts at 12:10 PM

Join the Museum and Illinois Wesleyan University for the second Zoom Lunch and Learn of the season. Dan Roberts, Associate Professor of Math, and Zahia Drici, Chairperson/Professor of Math, Illinois Wesleyan University, will present a program about the useful applications of math in every day life! Mathematics can be used to analyze trends and make predictions about the future. We will examine two scenarios from the local community where a mathematical approach is being used to help gain insights: establishing a grocery in a food desert, and installing an aquatic complex in a neighborhood.


To register for this Zoom webinar, please visit https://bit.ly/MCMHOctLL. Questions? Please contact the Marketing Department at marketing@mchistory.org. Grab your lunch and join us from where ever you may be! You won’t want to miss this fascinating program.

Friday, October 22

Miller Park Zoo Spooktacular

Starts at 5:00 PM

Find the Museum at Miller Park Zoo on Friday, October 22 and Saturday, October 23 from 5:00-8:00 p.m. for the annual Spooktacular! Ghouls and goblins of all ages are welcome to trick and treat their way through the Zoo. Ask yourself, “How Spooky Is It?” with an exploration of the eeriest objects in the Museum’s collection. And get a non-edible, allergen-friendly treat while you are at. More information can be found at https://www.bloomingtonparks.o…

Saturday, October 23

Miller Park Zoo Spooktacular

Starts at 5:00 PM

Find the Museum at Miller Park Zoo on Friday, October 22 and Saturday, October 23 from 5:00-8:00 p.m. for the annual Spooktacular! Ghouls and goblins of all ages are welcome to trick and treat their way through the Zoo. Ask yourself, “How Spooky Is It?” with an exploration of the eeriest objects in the Museum’s collection. And get a non-edible, allergen-friendly treat while you are at. More information can be found at https://www.bloomingtonparks.o…

Tuesday, October 26

The Night the Stars Fell with Bill Kemp

Starts at 7:00 PM

On Tuesday, October 26 at 7:00 p.m., join Museum Librarian Bill Kemp for a free, zoom webinar that will take program participants back to November 13, 1833, when the nighttime sky lit up like an Independence Day sparkler in what’s believed to be the most intense meteor shower in recorded human history.

At this time, Central Illinois was still the frontier, and meteor showers were mysterious and misunderstood phenomena. What did early settlers make of this spectacular–and for some, spectacularly terrifying–event? Where, in fact, did these meteors come from? And what’s the connection between the “Night the Stars Fell” and the Leonids, the annual meteor shower that visits Earth every November? This lavishly illustrated program will answer those and other questions. Bill promises a program sure to fascinate even those folks with little interest in–or knowledge of–astronomy.

To register for this free, zoom webinar, follow this link https://bit.ly/MCMHStarsFall. Questions? or for more information, contact the Education Department at education@mchistory.org or 309-827-0428.

Friday, October 29

Downtown Bloomington Trick-or-Treat

Starts at 5:00 PM

Downtown Trick-or-Treat will take place on October 29, 2021, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Join the Museum and all of our friends for a night of tricks and treats in Downtown Bloomington! Prepare to be haunted by the spectacle of the Museum Square lit up for the occasion thanks to Palace Events and be sure to stop by the Washington Street plaza for a non-edible, allergen-friendly treat!

We are happy to help bring this event back to Downtown! All participants are encouraged to wear facial coverings, so boast your best masks to complete your costumes! See you on the streets for tricks and treats!