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Archive of: 1890s

My Store, Bloomington, undated 100 block of South Center Street

Oscar Mandel and brother-in-law John S. Bachrach in front of their general store, undated.

The name My Store first appears in the 1891 Bloomington city directory. Oscar Mandel and brother-in-law John S. Bachrach embarked on an ambitious expansion plan, erecting a five-story “trade palace” in 1912.

Hougham’s Halloween Party? Village of McLean, ca. 1890

Old Halloween Party, 1890s.

Not much is known about this photo other than the handwritten caption indicating it was taken at Albert and Betty (or Bettie) Hougham’s home in McLean, about 1890.

Bloomington High School Class of 1898

Bloomington High School graduation, 1898.

The June 3, 1898, Bloomington High School commencement exercises were held at the Grand Opera House on East Market Street. At this time the high school was located on the north side of Monroe Street between Prairie and Gridley streets

The Meyer Brewing Co.

Advertisement from the Bloomington City Directory, 1904

The McLean County Museum of History holds a small collection of artifacts used by the Meyer Brewing Company of Bloomington, IL, a local brewery that enjoyed much success prior to Prohibition.

McHistory: Going to Danvers to Take the Cure

The Hamlet of Danvers once hosted a sanatorium for those struggling with addiction to alcohol.

McHistory: Experiences in the Spanish American War

In this Black History Month edition of our Sound Ideas recurring series "McHistory," you'll hear from a Spanish Amerian War Soldier from Bloomington who writes home from eastern Cuba.

​Photo of the Week, 54: Ike Sander’s “Short Order House,” ca. 1903-1911

“Ike" Sanders and his first wife Allie Headley opened what's believed to be the first restaurant in Bloomington owned and operated by African Americans. The restaurant, which also doubled as a rooming house, was located at 306 South Main Street.

McHistory: Workin' In A Coal Mine

At the turn of the 20th century, a certain woman journalist put out four columns a week. She was a prolific writer turning in 2000 words at a crack, a wonderful interviewer, and nobody's fool. Madam Annette talked with everyone from businessmen and public officials to jail inmates. During GLT's recurring series "McHistory" we hear portions of one of Madam Annette's columns as she explores a coal mine under Bloomington. McLean County Museum of History Development Director Beth Whisman reads the column with comment from Archivist Bill Kemp.

Hear the audio here

"McHistory" is a co-production of WGLT and the McLean County Museum of History using the letters, diaries, and documents of days gone by

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