200 North Main Street | Bloomington, Illinois | 309-827-0428

#1920s

Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

C.W. Frey’s Showroom Downtown Bloomington, circa 1929-30

Old car show room, 1929.

Clarence W. Frey & Sons was a longtime auto dealership and service center. Seen here is a Frey showroom with circa 1929-1930 Studebakers.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 112: Lincoln Marker Dedication, June 1922

Lincoln Marker Dedication, June 1922

In 1922 and 1923, the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected 19 markers in Central Illinois commemorating the route Abraham Lincoln traveled on the Eighth Judicial Circuit.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 100: J.E. Will & Co. Fire, 1928, Deadliest in Twin City History

J.E. Will & Co. Fire, 1928, Deadliest in Twin City History

In May 1928, a 40-foot-high rear wall of the burned-out J.E. Will & Co. furniture store in downtown Bloomington buckled and collapsed in a shower of bricks and other debris.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 89: Livingston Flats—Gone but not Forgotten

Livingston Flats, Bloomington Illinois

Located at the northeast corner of East and Jefferson streets in downtown Bloomington, the Livingston Flats served as a mixed-use development (residential and commercial) for the better part of 45 years.

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Written by Susan Hartzold in Collection Highlights

How much influence can a historic event have on popular clothing design?

This flapper* dress, though not a Paris design, is hand stitched and beaded, and was collected by Marlyn Lawrentz, a Bloomington resident who adored vintage clothing. She donated it to the Museum in 1996. The circular patterning around the neckline was influenced by beaded collars, like the one pictured below, that were removed from Tut’s tomb.

The dress pictured here was designed in the 1920s and was most definitely influenced by an archaeological event.The geometric beaded pattern was influenced by Egyptian design, but what was the event?

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Written by Susan Hartzold in Collection Highlights

Prohibition doll unique item from 1920s

The Museum owns a very unique method used to transport illegal hooch; a prohibition doll.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 55: McKnight & McKnight Building, August 1929

Designed by local architect George H. Miller, this steel-frame “high-rise" with cream-colored glazed brick, was the tallest building in Bloomington upon its completion.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 46: Santa Spotted in Downtown Bloomington, 1929

Merry Christmas from the Museum's staff and Board of Directors!

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Written by Torii Moré in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 35: Home Sweet Home Mission, Downtown Bloomington, 1920s

This longtime non-profit social service organization was founded in 1917 by candy maker-turned-evangelist Billy Shelper. First known as Home Sweet Home City Rescue Mission, it was located at 111 South Main Street (seen here) from 1920 to 1926.

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Written by Torii Moré in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 34: Bloomington that-a-way?

In 1929, an “air marker" was placed atop The Daily Pantagraph building in downtown Bloomington. Why then did this sign tell pilots that Bloomington is five miles further to the north?

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